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Intimate partner violence in 46 low-income and middle-income countries: an appraisal of the most vulnerable groups of women using national health surveys
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  • Published on:
    COVID-19: Considerations of domestic violence amongst low- and middle-income countries.
    • Catherine Santucci, Medical Student Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry
    • Other Contributors:
      • Georgia Raniolo, Medical Student

    Dear Editor,

    We read with great interest the original research by Coll CVN, Ewerling F, García-Moreno C, et al which found that domestic violence in low- and middle-income countries was more prevalent amongst certain groups of women.

    The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has already ravaged countries within Asia, Europe and the United States, defined as high-income by the World Bank Group. [1] Actions taken to prevent the spread of the virus has meant a large proportion of the population in these countries is currently under some degree of confinement, and consequently, an alarming increase in domestic violence has been reported by the news. [2]

    Coll CVN, Ewerling F, García-Moreno C, et al recognises Africa and SouthEast Asia to have a higher prevalence of domestic violence. At the time of writing (29/03/2020), the WHO has already reported 3005 cases and 51 deaths in Africa and 3709 cases and 139 deaths in SouthEast Asia, with no doubt that these numbers will continue to grow. [3]

    Resources to fight the COVID-19 epidemics in these regions are limited and thus, efforts aiming to curb the transmission will soon undoubtedly follow other countries’ mitigation plans; police enforcing a lockdown, healthcare workers treating COVID-19 patients and government officials attempting to gather the necessary equipment for the care of its citizens. This means an extensive proportion of the workforce needed to help women undergoing domestic violence will already be si...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.