Responses

Download PDFPDF

Global health and human rights for a postpandemic world
Compose Response

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Author Information
First or given name, e.g. 'Peter'.
Your last, or family, name, e.g. 'MacMoody'.
Your email address, e.g. higgs-boson@gmail.com
Your role and/or occupation, e.g. 'Orthopedic Surgeon'.
Your organization or institution (if applicable), e.g. 'Royal Free Hospital'.
Statement of Competing Interests

PLEASE NOTE:

  • Responses are moderated before posting and publication is at the absolute discretion of BMJ, however they are not peer-reviewed
  • Once published, you will not have the right to remove or edit your response. Removal or editing of responses is at BMJ's absolute discretion
  • If patients could recognise themselves, or anyone else could recognise a patient from your description, please obtain the patient's written consent to publication and send them to the editorial office before submitting your response [Patient consent forms]
  • By submitting this response you are agreeing to our full [Response terms and requirements]

Vertical Tabs

Other responses

Jump to comment:

  • Published on:
    MITIGATION MEASURES TO PREVENT THE NEXT PANDEMIC
    • Sougat Ray, Public Health Specialist Professor
    • Other Contributors:
      • Shruti Vashisht, PhD Fellow

    We read with interest your Editorial on Global health and human rights for a postpandemic world and offering our comments on this important issue.1

    COVID 19 has rampaged an unprepared world. With its high infectiousness, low virulence and asymptomatic transmission, it has crossed boundaries rapidly and affected millions. The mode of transmission of the disease, whether by large droplet (>5µm) as fomites through surface, short distance aerosol borne or long distance airborne by small particles (<5µm) is still being debated Containment and lock down strategies adopted by all affected countries to control the spread have shown mixed results but has devastated the economy and caused major societal disruptions. The policy makers aggressively contained densely populated urban areas, quarantined ships, care homes and jails but the disease has continued to spread rapidly. High fatality rates in hospitals with sophisticated infrastructures and health workers getting infected have exposed gaps in basic understanding of control of airborne diseases and their management in health care settings. The defence forces, specially the naval ships got affected all over the world. With history of pandemic diseases repeating at regular intervals, it is now amply evident that viral diseases will re-emerge in times to come, either in another novel form or as a bioweapon and effective and holistic mitigation measures will be crucial.2

    Airborne or droplet borne. The infectious...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.