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Mobile applications addressing violence against women: a systematic review
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  • Published on:
    Integrating tech solutions into traditional gender-based violence programs
    • Katy Johnson, Program Officer, Sexual Violence in Conflict Zones Physicians for Human Rights
    • Other Contributors:
      • Thomas McHale, Senior Program Officer, Sexual Violence in Conflict Zones
      • Karen Naimer, Director of Programs
      • Ranit Mishori, Senior Medical Advisor & Professor

    Dear Editor,

    We were pleased to read the review by Eisenhut K, Sauerborn E, García-Moreno C, et al. and appreciated their insights on the landscape of mobile apps addressing violence against women.

    We read with great interest the authors’ observation that “collaborations between mHealth and ‘traditional’ approaches should be actively sought, subordinating the technology to the overall aims of preventing violence against women and mitigating its impacts.” In that spirit, we would like to highlight Physicians for Human Rights’ (PHR) experience implementing a “tech” solution within a larger “low-tech” programmatic ecosystem to address violence against women (VAW).

    The Program on Sexual Violence in Conflict Zones at Physicians for Human Rights works with medical, legal, and law enforcement partners in Central and East Africa to address impunity for sexual violence in conflict. Since 2011, we and our partners have trained more than 2,000 professionals in the collection, documentation, and use of court-admissible forensic evidence of sexual violence. As part of this initiative, PHR developed MediCapt, an award-winning mobile application, which standardizes and digitizes the collection of forensic documentation of medical evidence of sexual violence and combines it with a mobile camera to capture and securely store forensic photographic evidence of injuries. MediCapt was “co-designed” with clinician-partners in Kenya and the Democratic Republic of the Congo a...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.