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Global health education in UK medical schools: a review of undergraduate university curricula
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  • Published on:
    Letter to the Editor Regarding Global health education in UK medical schools: a review of undergraduate university curricula
    • Soham Bandyopadhyay, Doctor Oxford University Global Surgery Group, Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, Medical Sciences Division, University of Oxfor

    I congratulate the authors who successfully conducted a survey on the current provision of global health education (GHE) in United Kingdom (UK) medical schools.1 Their findings are in keeping with a recent cross-sectional study into the timetables of UK medical schools.2 In the methods section of the paper, the global health learning outcomes and competencies surveyed were listed. However, global surgery was neither surveyed nor discussed in this paper.

    This occurred despite global surgery being added as a mandatory learning objective to the national undergraduate curriculum in surgery by the Royal College of England in 2015.3 Post 2015, GHE studies2 and study protocols4 have typically strived to ensure that global surgery is assessed within their study designs. This is particularly important as global surgery often becomes the ‘neglected stepchild of global health’.5 It is easy to see why given that approximately two-thirds of UK medical courses are reported not to cover this topic within their core curriculum.2 It is not in the best interests of the population for a subject of such importance to be ignored by global health researchers and educational institutions.

    Therefore, whilst it is encouraging that a study has been done with the aim of identifying gaps in GHE teaching in UK medical schools, the study design in and of itself has resulted in the researchers missing gaps.2 This exemplifies the importance of having a diverse range of stakeholders involve...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.