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Health system redesign for maternal and newborn survival: rethinking care models to close the global equity gap
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  • Published on:
    Health system redesign for maternal and newborn survival: rethinking care models to close the global equity gap
    • Utoomporn Wongsin, Public health researcher Global health and Health security Program, College of Public Health, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan
    • Other Contributors:
      • Sihle Agrippa Dlamini, State Registered Nurse
      • Usman Iqbal, Assistant Professor

    It was interesting to read Roder-DeWan S et al.,(1) paper entitle Health system redesign for maternal and newborn survival: rethinking care models to close the global equity gap.
    This paper focuses on problems with the current approach, discuss the feasibility of redesign, propose reforms to transform current health systems. We support the authors that health system redesign is needed to enhance people’s access to standard care and reduce newborn mortality rate especially in low- income country which is higher than in high-income countries about nine times(1). This is also in line with Sustainable Development Goal No.3 (SDGs) target 3.1 that by 2030, reduce the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100,000 live births(2). Gabrysch S et al,(2019) found in their study that giving birth in a health care facility does not necessarily gives assurance of a survival benefit for women or babies however it should be recommended in facilities capable of providing emergency obstetric and newborn care and capable of safeguarding uncomplicated births(3).
    It is therefore important to reconsider the healthcare systems so that every pregnant woman receives the best of healthcare. Niyitegeka J et al,(2017) in a study conducted in Rwanda found out that women who had to travel more than 90 minutes to the nearest district hospital had significantly worse neonatal outcomes compared to those had Odds Ratio 5.12 times referred from health centers located on the same...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Health system redesign for maternal and newborn survival: rethinking care models to close the global equity gap.
    • Utoomporn Wongsin, Public health researcher Global health and Health security Program, College of Public Health, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan
    • Other Contributors:
      • Sihle Agrippa Dlamini, State Registered Nurse
      • Usman Iqbal, Assistant Professor

    It was interesting to read Roder-DeWan S et al.,(1) paper entitle Health system redesign for maternal and newborn survival: rethinking care models to close the global equity gap.
    This paper focuses on problems with the current approach, discuss the feasibility of redesign, propose reforms to transform current health systems. We support the authors that health system redesign is needed to enhance people’s access to standard care and reduce newborn mortality rate especially in low- income country which is higher than in high-income countries about nine times(1). This is also in line with Sustainable Development Goal No.3 (SDGs) target 3.1 that by 2030, reduce the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100,000 live births(2). Gabrysch S et al,(2019) found in their study that giving birth in a health care facility does not necessarily gives assurance of a survival benefit for women or babies however it should be recommended in facilities capable of providing emergency obstetric and newborn care and capable of safeguarding uncomplicated births(3).
    It is therefore important to reconsider the healthcare systems so that every pregnant woman receives the best of healthcare. Niyitegeka J et al,(2017) in a study conducted in Rwanda found out that women who had to travel more than 90 minutes to the nearest district hospital had significantly worse neonatal outcomes compared to those had Odds Ratio 5.12 times referred from health centers located on the same...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.