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Self-administration of injectable contraception: a systematic review and meta-analysis
  1. Caitlin E Kennedy1,
  2. Ping Teresa Yeh2,
  3. Mary Lyn Gaffield3,
  4. Martha Brady4,
  5. Manjulaa Narasimhan5
  1. 1Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
  2. 2Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
  3. 3Human Reproduction Programme (HRP), Organisation mondiale de la Sante, Geneve, Switzerland
  4. 4PATH, Washington, District of Columbia, USA
  5. 5Human Reproduction Programme (HRP), World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland
  1. Correspondence to Dr Manjulaa Narasimhan; narasimhanm{at}who.int

Abstract

Introduction Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate subcutaneous injectable contraception (DMPA-SC) may facilitate self-administration and expand contraceptive access. To inform WHO guidelines on self-care interventions, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing self-administration versus provider administration of injectable contraception on outcomes of pregnancy, side effects/adverse events, contraceptive uptake, contraceptive continuation, self-efficacy/empowerment and social harms.

Methods We searched PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, LILACS and EMBASE in September 2018 for peer-reviewed studies comparing women who received injectable contraception with the option of self-administration with women who received provider-administered injectable contraception on at least one outcome of interest. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane tool for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and the Evidence Project tool for non-randomised studies. Meta-analysis was conducted using random-effects models to generate pooled estimates of relative risk (RR).

Results Six studies with 3851 total participants met the inclusion criteria: three RCTs and three controlled cohort studies. All studies examined self-injection of DMPA-SC; comparison groups were either provider-administered DMPA-SC or provider-administered intramuscular DMPA. All studies followed women through 12 months of contraceptive coverage and measured (dis)continuation of injectable contraception. Meta-analysis found higher rates of continuation with self-administration compared with provider administration in three RCTs (RR: 1.27, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.39) and three controlled cohort studies (RR: 1.18, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.26). Four studies reported pregnancies; all showed no difference across study arms. Four studies reported side effects/adverse events; while two controlled cohort studies showed increased injection site reactions with self-administration, no other side effects increased with self-administration. One study found no difference in social harms. No studies reported measuring uptake or self-efficacy/empowerment.

Conclusion A growing evidence base suggests that self-administration of DMPA-SC can equal or improve contraceptive continuation rates compared with provider administration. This benefit comes without notable increases in pregnancy or safety concerns. Self-injection of DMPA-SC is a promising approach to increasing contraceptive use.

  • self-administration
  • injectable contraceptive
  • DMPA
  • systematic review
  • meta-analysis

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Footnotes

  • Handling editor Dr Soumyadeep Bhaumik

  • Contributors MN conceptualised the study. CEK and PTY designed the protocol with input from MEG and MN. CEK ran the search and oversaw screening, data extraction and assessment of bias. PTY and CEK conducted the meta-analysis. CEK drafted the manuscript, while PTY, MB, MEG and MN reviewed the draft and provided critical feedback. All authors read and approved the final manuscript. The corresponding author, as guarantor, accepts full responsibility for the finished article, has access to any data and controlled the decision to publish. The corresponding author attests that all listed authors meet the authorship criteria and that no others meeting the criteria have been omitted.

  • Funding We gratefully acknowledge financial support from the UNDP-UNFPA-UNICEF-WHO-World Bank Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction (HRP). The funder was involved in the study design, but played no part in the decision to submit the article for publication, nor in the collection, analysis and interpretation of data. All authors had full access to all of the data (including statistical reports and tables) in the study and can take responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data sharing statement All data come from published journal articles. Extracted data are available on request to the corresponding author.

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