Responses

Download PDFPDF

Women's health: a new global agenda
Compose Response

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Author Information
First or given name, e.g. 'Peter'.
Your last, or family, name, e.g. 'MacMoody'.
Your email address, e.g. higgs-boson@gmail.com
Your role and/or occupation, e.g. 'Orthopedic Surgeon'.
Your organization or institution (if applicable), e.g. 'Royal Free Hospital'.
Statement of Competing Interests

PLEASE NOTE:

  • Responses are moderated before posting and publication is at the absolute discretion of BMJ, however they are not peer-reviewed
  • Once published, you will not have the right to remove or edit your response. Removal or editing of responses is at BMJ's absolute discretion
  • If patients could recognise themselves, or anyone else could recognise a patient from your description, please obtain the patient's written consent to publication and send them to the editorial office before submitting your response [Patient consent forms]
  • By submitting this response you are agreeing to our full [Response terms and requirements]

Vertical Tabs

Other responses

Jump to comment:

  • Published on:
    RE: Women's health and men's health - let's move forward together

    Dr Peters et al's call for action to reduce the global burden of disease more efficiently in women and men is very well made.

    Their article focuses on women's health but many similar points could be made about men's. WHO data shows that, globally in 2012, 52% of all deaths from NCDs were male. Males were more likely than females to die prematurely (under 70 years) from NCDs in almost every country. The major risk factors for NCDs include unhealthy diets, tobacco use and the harmful use of alcohol and men do worse than women in respect of all of these. Data from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 shows that, in that year, 55% of deaths from dietary risk factors were male as were 72% of deaths from tobacco smoking and 65% of deaths from alcohol.
    Life expectancy data also highlights the health burden borne by men. Globally, male life expectancy at birth, at 68 years, lags five years behind female life expectancy and the global ‘gap’ is predicted to increase over the next 15 years: by 2030, male life expectancy could well be seven years shorter than female life expectancy.
    Global as well as the almost all national health policies have largely ignored men. The UN’s Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health (2016-30) overlooks boys and world leaders at the 2016 G7 Ise-Shima Summit in Japan made important commitments to improving women’s health but did not mention men.

    The...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.