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Availability and provision of emergency obstetric care under a public–private partnership in three districts of Gujarat, India: lessons for Universal Health Coverage
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  • Published on:
    Emergency obstetric care in India
    • Manas P Roy, Public Health Specialist Safdarjung Hospital

    To the Editor
    The article by Iyer et al. depicted the huge gap between recommended and actual scenario in Indian maternity care.1 The authors correctly pointed out the concentration of case load in a few numbers of hospitals. The study also highlighted skewed allocation of health care resources and dominance of the private sector; two recognized obstacles for achieving universal health care in a developing country like India.
    However, had they adopted country-specific guidelines instead of UN criteria, they would have been able to reflect the scenario in synchronization with the national perspective. The guidelines, as envisaged under 12th Five Year Plan (FYP), recommend two comprehensive emergency obstetric care (CEmOC) centers and 18 basic emergency obstetric care (BEmOC) centers for a population of one million in our country, considering 70% deliveries in public sector.2 Although the required number of CEmOC centers matches the UN criteria, the national norm differs in term of number of BEmOC centers from the UN criteria.3
    The strategy under 12th FYP laid down uniform protocol for proportional distribution of delivery case load across the country. With this purpose, it designated all facilities conducting more than three deliveries per month as Delivery Point (DP) and identified few potential DP in each district. However, the presence of a Newborn Care Corner (NBCC) equipped with a radiant warmer and other basic amenities required for a newborn is a mu...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.