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India's plan to eliminate tuberculosis by 2025: converting rhetoric into reality
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  • Published on:
    Recent efforts to boost India’s plan of tuberculosis elimination
    • Manas P Roy, Public Health Specialist Safdarjung Hospital, New Delhi
    Dear Editor,
    Pai et al put up a timely assessment of India’s ambition of achieving tuberculosis elimination by 2025.1 However, the authors seemed to have overlooked the major developments that have been introduced recently in the country. Inclusion of the updated facts could have enriched the discussion, I believe.
    In January 2017, a door to door campaign for active case finding for tuberculosis has been started by the Central TB Division (CTD).2 The scheme, if proved successful, has the capacity to effectively reduce the mean delay of two months between appearance of symptoms and initiation of treatment. This, along with introduction of bedaquiline at six referral sites and enhancing the use of cartridge based nucleic acid amplification test across the country, is expected to boost the performance of Revised National TB Control Programme in near future. In fact, CTD has already decided to start daily regimen in 104 districts, spread over five states.3 
    Now, apart from the budget, the future would also depend on successful vigilance on the dispensing pattern of anti tubercular drugs from private and informal sectors. A study earlier has demonstrated the use of steroids and fluoroquinolones by the pharmacists for probable cases of tuberculosis.5 With the warning against the silent rise of drug resistant tuberculosis and a projected 275% increase in the risk of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis in India over next 20 years, the...
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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.